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September 2018 newsletterACEN LinkedIn GroupACEN

In this issue

1. From the President

2. 2018 ACEN Conference

3. Nomination as an ACEN Director at 2018 AGM

4. ACEN Awards

Local hero

Collaboration

Case Studies

5. Linking Industry and University

6. ACEN Webinar - 'Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for assessing WIL'

7. WIL to Work Project for International Students

8. WIL Manager, University of Waikato

9. Impact of an experience at the Jewish Holocaust Centre

10. Emerging Models in WIL workshop

1. From the President

Judie Kay ACEN PresidentLast week saw the release of the Australian Industry Group's 2018 survey of Industry members: Skilling A National Imperative. The report makes interesting reading with some key findings of great interest to the WIL community.

Employer dissatisfaction with graduates has decreased since 2016 with employers reporting increased links with universities and VET with companies with no inks to education sectors dropping to 27% from 50% in 2014.The main link to higher education providers is the provision of work placements at 36% a 6 per cent increase since 2016. This result is a great confirmation of all the work going on across the country around WIL with the trend indicating a great opportunity moving forward. The survey results indicate the type of support sought by companies to involve university students in their organisations and includes examples of student activities (43%), a relevant contact point (33%) and information on supervising students (30%). This provides us with tangible ideas to consider  to enhance our own engagement with industry and community. ACEN has been responding to these trends, in collaboration with our partners for the National WIL Strategy.

ACEN State Chapters have developed a list of key WIL contacts for every university which Industry Groups will soon promote to their members.

I would also encourage you to utilise and disseminate the nationally developed resources around supervision, assessment and preparation for WIL designed for our industry and community partners.

Don't miss out on the ACEN National Conference 2018 … there is a great program and keynotes with  over 270 registrations and colleagues joining us from across the country as well as Hong Kong, New Zealand, Canada and South Africa its shaping up to be one of our biggest conferences ever. Looking forward to catching up with many of you in Brisbane

Judie Kay

ACEN President

2. 2018 ACEN Conference

2018 ACEN Conference

Program now available!

Of course 'subject to change without notice'

3. Nomination as an ACEN Director at 2018 AGM

PencilsNominations are called for up to FIVE eligible members to be elected as Directors at the ACEN Annual General Meeting. Current directors retiring under this requirement may choose to nominate again.

Elections for the above positions will be held at the Annual General Meeting to be held on 2.30 PM AEDT, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2018

To be eligible for election to the above positions members must be registered on the Members Register, prior to date of the general meeting, and to have their nomination supported by two other Members who are eligible to vote. Nominations must be received by the Secretary at admin@acen.edu.au not later than 5.00pm AEST, FRIDAY October 5, using the attached form.

Nominating Members should be aware that they are obligated to demonstrate support from their employer for their participation on the Board, including attendance at one face-to-face meeting each year.

See also http://acen.edu.au/executive-responsibilities/ and http://acen.edu.au/board-code-of-conduct/

4. ACEN Awards

Figure on podiumThe three finalists for the Local Hero Award, for Collaboration Award and Excellence in Case Studies are now revealed.

Congratulations to those organisations for reaching this stage and a big thank you to the people who prepared the submissions.

The winner of each award will be announced at the Annual Conference.

5. Linking Industry and University

WIL contacts in universities is a page being developed to assist industry make direct contact with WIL people in universities.

It will be updated periodically.

6. ACEN Webinar - 'Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for assessing WIL'

Lisa SchmidtDate 31st October 11.30 AEDT 9.30 WST

Presenter: Associate Professor Lisa Schmidt

Lisa is the Dean (Education) for the College of Medicine and Public Health at Flinders University where she provides strategic leadership of the College's educational activities and the experience of its students. The College delivers integrated clinical, population health and bioscience courses with an emphasis on developing future researchers.

Details to follow

7. WIL to Work Project for International Students

WIL to Work is a new collaborative project supported by the Australian International Education: Enabling Growth and Innovation project fund, Department of Education and Training.

A consortia drawn from ATN Universities (QUT, Curtin, RMIT, UniSA and UTS) are working together to develop online modules and resources which will specifically cater to the needs of international students, preparing them for WIL and building their capability in order to optimise their employability outcomes from their experiences.

The first phase of the project involves collecting information, data and existing WIL resources available for international students. If you are able to provide any information on the topic, examples of resources, or have any questions about the WIL to Work project please contact natalie.colton@rmit.edu.au

8. WIL Manager, University of Waikato

University of WaikatoThe Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) Central Unit has been established to ensure every undergraduate student is presented with the opportunity to undertake some form of work-integrated learning as part of their qualification.

In this position you will be responsible for maintaining central oversight of all operational WIL processes at the University. You will establish and maintain connections between University staff and industry, employers, researchers and professional bodies to create collaborative relationships and identify opportunities to strengthen staff and student engagement in WIL.

9. Impact of an experience at the Jewish Holocaust Centre

Staff and volunters, Jewish Holocaust Centre

Staff and volunteers from the Jewish Holocaust Centre. Julia, host and mentor is third on the left.

Curtin University Master of Information Management (MIM*) student Melissah Crumpton participated in an invaluable work integrated learning experience at the Jewish Holocaust Centre (JHC) in Elsternwick, Melbourne. Melissah has a special interest in the Holocaust and the Centre, having written on the organisation for her Master of Cultural Heritage. The JHC Curator connected Bec Shillington, the Curtin University Practicum Program Coordinator, with Julia Reichstein, the JHC Librarian and Information Manager. Julia kindly agreed to host Melissah full time in February and then in a part time arrangement across Sundays to the end of April.

For Melissah this WIL experience enabled her to meaningfully apply her MIM studies. Melissah considers herself most fortunate to have been hosted and mentored by Julia. Julia was welcoming, knowledgeable and professional. Melissah commented that 'The practicum demonstrated that I understood the academic work and could apply it in a 'real world' situation. I would recommend this placement for future practicums because not only do they do their utmost to ensure the work you are performing is of interest, is practical, and will be of use, but the work being undertaken is for an institution that has an important place in historical, social, and cultural memory, as well as carrying out important work in education'.

Melissah completed projects based around cataloguing, research for patrons, historical fact checking for a memoir and collection management. Attendance at two education programs enabled Melissah to witness how the JHC connects contents with its educational goals and mission. Melissah commented: This was a key learning experience for me as it demonstrated the importance of educating students about the Holocaust but it also showed the passion and articulation of those who conduct these programs, as well as the importance of the experience of those who survived. Melissah was also most fortunate to witness the acceptance of a long-term loan Torah scroll.

In Julia's evaluation, she stated that 'Melissah just had a profound respect and investment in both the profession and the mission statement that drives our services… synchronised to our objectives and emotional mindset. It was a blessing to have Melissah on the team. I feel very indebted to her for her contributions, adaptability, warm and willing attitude. It was wonderful to see projects that had been on the back-burner for extended time be embraced by Melissah and in many cases, brought to completion. Melissah was especially significant in our efforts to fact-check a memoir. We met our deadline thanks to Melissah and co. Melissah will be credited in the acknowledgements section of the book to be launched on Sunday, 15 July 2018'.

Sincere thanks to Julia Reichstein for hosting and mentoring Melissah and Rae Silverstein, Coordinator of Volunteers, and Jayne Josem. Curtin University is very grateful to the JHC for supporting this WIL opportunity.

*The MIM is accredited by three professional bodies: Australian Library and Information Association [ALIA], Australian Society of Archivists [ASA] and Records and Information Management Professionals Australasia [RIMPA]. The MIM requires two work integrated learning experiences of three weeks duration each to be successfully completed.

10. Emerging Models in WIL workshop

ACEN WA held its third event of the year, the Emerging Models in WIL workshop which was facilitated by Sonia Ferns, Louis Geneste, Jane Matthews, Anne Farren and Janet Beilby. The facilitators provided snapshots of their practice in innovative WIL, taking participants on a journey through design thinking in Business; multi-disciplinary, industry-based projects; events management in Fashion; and developing empathy in clinical students through simulation. There was rich discussion about the benefits of these forms of WIL that deviate from traditional models, as well as challenges relating to workload and resourcing. In an era where WIL is recognised as a key vehicle for enhancing student employability, the workshop highlighted the value of emerging models and the need for practitioners to continue the good work in making WIL scalable while retaining quality and value-add.