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June 2018 newsletterACEN LinkedIn GroupACEN

In this issue

1. From the President

2. 2018 ACEN Conference

3. 'To improve internships and placements, embed technology in their design'

4. 'Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement'

5. In The News

6. Honorary Life Membership nominations

7. ACEN Awards

8. Invitation to participate in research

9. Optimising student outcomes through post-experience interventions

1. From the President

Judie Kay ACEN PresidentUniversity Australia has been conducting a national WIL data collection funded through the Federal Government's Enabling Growth and Innovation Program. Each university submitted data on the number of WIL activities and unique students in 2017 participating in placements, projects, fieldwork, simulated activities and other WIL activities. The data collected, which also included WIL across fields of study, is now being analysed and a report will be available in second semester. Many of you will have been involved in collecting WIL data in your own university. For most universities this is the first time that this data has been collected and it has presented a range challenges in identifying and recording all WIL activity across an institution. However the report should provide a valuable snapshot of WIL across Australia and my guess is that this wont be the last time this data will be collected. 

This WIL data collection highlights the increased focus on WIL nationally as a key indicator in tertiary education. At the same time Minister Birmingham has written to all universities and peak industry groups seeking information on strategies universities and industry bodies are implementing to support students to ensure they are able to successfully participate in WIL. The ACEN Board on behalf of all ACEN members has written to the Minister to urge him to support the National WIL Strategy measures to address the challenges facing the sector around WIL. We have called particular attention to the success of the Canadian Government in providing incentives to increase industry engagement with WIL and suggested the Government consider introducing similar incentives. 

Again I remind you to register for the ACEN conference. This is a not to be missed conference with great keynotes now announced and a large number of presentations and papers currently being reviewed .It is shaping up to be a very informative few days with great networking as always!

2. 2018 ACEN Conference

ACEN 2018 conference strip

Earyly bird registration extended

Save with early bird discounts - now extended to July 31.

Poster Submissions from Higher Degree Research Students and Early Career Academics

Are you undertaking research in WIL as part of Masters and Higher Degree Research programs, or are you an Early Career Academic (within two years of completing their PhD studies)?

 You are invited to submit a poster abstract for the conference. ACEN recognises and values the contribution of emerging WIL researchers and is keen to support you and help disseminate your research to the wider WIL community.

 Poster submissions need to be evidence-based and should outline the background/context and outcomes (if available). Further details, including how to submit, are available via the conference website. Presenters will have the opportunity to promote and discuss their work with conference delegates via an interactive poster viewing session. A dedicated session will also be scheduled during the conference for HDR students and early career academics to share their experiences of researching in WIL and to network.

Details to be announced.

3. 'To improve internships and placements, embed technology in their design'

The Conversation 'To improve internships and placements, embed technology in their design'By ACEN Board member Denise Jackson, Associate Professor / Coordinator of Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) programs, ECU School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University

Work integrated learning helps prepare students for the world of work. It involves students collaborating with industry and community partners as part of their degree program. It can be an immersed experience where students participate in internships, practicums or placements, or a virtual or on-campus experience where students are engaged in consulting, projects or simulations with industry partners. But it’s currently not properly preparing students for the type of workplace that lies ahead.

4. 'Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement'

Gateways journalThe latest volume of Gateways, Volume 11, No. 1 is now available. This collection of peer-reviewed research articles demonstrates the diversity of the work being undertaken in the areas of community campus partnerships.

Volume 11, No. 2, due for publication in December 2018, is now open for submissions. 

5. In The News

6. Honorary Life Membership nominations

Nominations are invited for the Honorary Life Members to recognise the oustatdnidng service given by individuals.

Criteria for assessing applications will include

Honorary Life memberships will be awarded at the discretion of the ACEN Board.

Nominations close on July 31, 2018

7. ACEN Awards

ACEN awards

ACEN Collaboration Award

This award is made to a partner organisation that is collaborating with a university to provide a sustained and significant contribution to WIL.

Institutions may submit multiple nominations.

This year documents can also be uploaded in support of the nomination.

Nominations close on July 31, 2018.

ACEN Local Hero Award

This award is made to a small-medium enterprise (SME; 0-199 employees) partner that is contributing to WIL beyond the expectations of the size of their organisation.

Institutions may submit multiple nominations.

This year documents can also be uploaded in support of the nomination.

Nominations close on July 31, 2018.

WIL Case Study Award

There are some great examples of WIL out there. From formal placements, on-line preparatory programs and virtual team projects, many of us have developed WIL initiatives that are innovative and adaptable, often on a shoe-string budget. These activities can often slip under the radar, but we want to give them the recognition they deserve! If you have an example of innovative practice in WIL that will motivate and inspire, we want to hear from you.

Submit an outline of your case study to ACEN. Those accepted and published on the ACEN website as exemplars of good practice by 1 August will automatically be considered for the 2018 ACEN Excellence in WIL case study award.

More info casestudies@acen.edu.au

8. Invitation to participate in research

WIL research info sheetThis project is part of a Doctor of Education study that aims to understand perceptions and experiences of educators in Work Integrated Learning in geographically diverse universities, against the broader framework of contemporary higher education. The research aims to capture as many WIL educator experiences as possible through the survey below. Participants can also opt in to be interviewed at the end of the survey. This multiinstitutional and transdisciplinary view of WIL across higher education institutions will contribute significantly to the enactment of WIL, revealing insights into the underlying philosophical and ideological perspectives of educators across a range of disciplines.

Melissa Sullivan from CQUniversity

9. Optimising student outcomes through post-experience interventions

ACEN WA workshop 'Optimising student outcomes from WIL through post-experience interventions

ACEN WA held its second workshop of the year last week - 'Optimising student outcomes from WIL through post-experience interventions'. The workshop was well-attended with almost 50 participants from all five WA universities. The workshop involved five local academics presenting their findings from the OLT-funded 'Augmenting students' learning through post-practicum educational processes' project led by Professor Stephen Billett.

The interventions included drawing on WIL to develop career management capabilities, professional identity, resilience, and self-efficacy among students. After the presentations, attendees broke out into small groups to discuss how the post-WIL interventions could be implemented in their own areas. There was some interesting debate on encouraging students to reflect in different ways and how to best engage them in interventions after their WIL experience had finished.